London

Frontpage
London-Map.gif

London is the capital of England.
English is the official national language in the UK, 275 seperate language are actually spoken in the nation's multicultural capital.

History

19th century London

During the 19th century, London was transformed into the world's largest city and capital of the British Empire. Its population expanded from 1 million in 1800 to 6.7 million a century later. During this period, London became a global political, financial, and trading capital.

21st century London

At the turn of the 21st century, London hosted the much derided Millennium Dome at Greenwich, to mark the new century. Other Millennium projects were more successful. One was the largest observation wheel in the world, the "Millennium Wheel", or the London Eye, which was erected as a temporary structure, but soon became a fixture, and draws four million visitors a year

Cockney

Southern London

Southern English engages in r-dropping, that is, r's are not pronounced after vowels, unless followed by another vowel. Instead, vowels are lengthened or have an /'/ off-glide, so fire becomes /fai'/, far becomes /fa:/, and so on

Northern London

The Northern dialect closely resembles the southern-most Scottish dialects. It retains many old Scandinavian words, such as bairn for child, and not only keeps its r's, but often rolls them. The most outstanding version is Geordie, the dialect of the Newcastle area.

-er > /æ/, so father > /fædhæ/.
/ou/ > /o:'/, so that boat sounds like each letter is pronounced.
talk > /ta:k/
work > /work/
book > /bu:k/
my > me
me > us
our > wor
you plural > youse
engages in r-dropping, that is, r's are not pronounced after vowels, unless followed by another vowel. Instead, vowels are lengthened or have an /'/ off-glide, so fire becomes /fai'/, far becomes /fa:/, and so on.

Yorkshire

The Yorkshire dialect is known for its sing-song quality, like Swedish, and retains its r's.

/œ/ > /u/, as in luck (/luk/).
the is reduced to t'.
initial h is dropped.
was > were.
still use thou (pronounced /tha/) and thee.
aught and naught (pronounced /aut/ or /out/ and /naut/ or /nout/) are used for anything and nothing.

West Midlands

This is the dialect of Ozzie Osbourne! While pronunciation is not that different from RP, some of the vocabulary is:

are > am
am, are (with a continuous sense) > bin
is not > ay
are not > bay

The West Country

in the West Country r's are not dropped. Initial s often becomes z (singer > zinger). Initial f often becomes v (finger > vinger). Vowels are lengthened.

East Midlands

The dialect of the East Midlands, once filled with interesting variations from county to county, is now predominantly RP. R's are dropped, but h's are pronounced. The only signs that differentiate it from RP:

ou > u: (so go becomes /gu:/).
RP yu; becomes u: after n, t, d… as in American English.

Frontpage
England

Sources

Webspace.ship.edu
Derek.co.uk
Wikipedia.org

Made by Camilla

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License